Tim energized at Native American Days Parade

Tim energized at Native American Days Parade

SIOUX FALLS—You have to see Tim in action in a parade to appreciate his passion, his drive, his energy.
Of course, he’s had a lot of experience. Tim has walked — and ran — through parades across South Dakota since he announced his candidacy for South Dakota’s lone seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in July 2017. For 15 months, he has crossed the state, shaking hands, slapping high-fives and engaging with South Dakotans.

The latest example was Monday in Sioux Falls during the inaugural Native American Day Parade. Tim was among the first to accept an invitation to the parade, which honored Native elders, including grand marshal Tim Giago, whose newspaper the Native Sun News endorsed Tim this summer.
Tim Giago, whose Lakota name is Nanwica Kciji, pushed for South Dakota to change Columbus Day to Native American Day and was able to persuade Gov. George S. Mickelson to do so in 1989, as they teamed to proclaim 1990 as a Year of Reconciliation in the state.
The two Tims took part in the parade, with Giago, perhaps the most acclaimed Native American journalist in the nation, hailed by the hundreds of people who attended the downtown parade in cool, wet conditions. Giago rode through the parade, waving to the assembled crowd.
Tim Bjorkman, however raced up and down the route along Phillips Avenue.
“Hi, everybody!” he called out. “Tim Bjorkman. I’m running for Congress. How are we all doing?”
The crowd responded with smiles and cheers.
“Go, Tim!” a woman called out.
“Good luck!” another woman shouted to Tim as he went past, offering handshakes and high-fives as he rolled along.


Native American issues are a vital part of the campaign. Tim has reached out to Natives throughout the campaign and has received warm support from the people he has met at parades, wacipis and other events.
It was a special day for the former Circuit Court judge and fifth-generation South Dakotan. Monday was Tim’s 62nd birthday but he didn’t take the day off.
Instead, he walked and ran along another parade route, continuing a campaign to represent all South Dakotans and bring reform and fundamental change to Congress. That’s what drives Tim.